FISH CUBA NOW! Support The Cuban People….Bailing Out With Bonefish

IMG_3825Bailout – maritime in origin, it’s the act of removing water from a sinking vessel….usually with a small bucket.

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Bailing Out With Bonefish
Every fly fisherman knows frustration when not able to find, feed or land their target species. But, to fishing guides – being compensated for their expertise – wind, clouds, murky water or a lack of interest are merely excuses.
Key West’s annual tarpon migration attracts a flood of anglers anxious to test their skills on one of the world’s top gamefish. At the height of the season, these silver sided, air breathing monsters flow down the beaches in schools often a mile long. Although an awesome sight for anyone with rod in hand, if the wind is wrong, the tarpon develop lockjaw.
On those days a Key’s guide may turn to barracuda as a bail out fish. Although exciting when hooked, jumping, snapping and armed with dangerous incisors, a ten pound cuda is not a hundred pound tarpon.
Capt. Grizz pursues marlin on fly – his territory, Cabo San Lucas Mexico. Twelve weight rods and a “tease them up and toss” technique is his preferred method for stripped, black, blue marlin and sailfish.
“Veteran captains know when it is not going to happen.” He says. “On those days we’ll head inshore for rooster fish or cero mackerel. We’ll downsize the tackle and bend a rod. It can turn the day around.”
Bailing out it’s called and every charter captain and guide has a plan. When the targeted species can’t be found or won’t co-operate, switch.
“Jardines de la Renia”- “Gardens of the Queen” is reverently referred to as the most natural reef and flats ecosystem existing in the Caribbean today. Cuba’s oldest aquatic preserve was a favorite spearfishing site for Fidel Castro, a fact, along with geography – it lies sixty miles off the island’s south coast – that has allowed it to lay virtually untouched by man.
This collection of uninhabited barrier Keys separates the shallow bay of Gulfo de Ana Maria from the rich blue waters of the Caribbean. Beyond the deserted white sand beaches and the pristine coral reefs, the ocean bottom drops to infinity.
My new friend Alek Rich first called it to my attention in the middle of our second day of fly fishing in the Gardens.
“See how he keeps taking us back to bonefish.” He said quietly. “Every time the fishing slows, we go back to catching bones.”

Alek and our Avalon fishing guide Tony are at the same stage of life, early twenties. Although separated by language, these two young men from totally diverse backgrounds and experiences found a bond in the shared love of fishing….the report was instant.
Alek recently graduated from Tulane with a degree in finance and has begun his banking career in Texas.
Tony just completed the two year training program required by all Avalon guides and now poles fly clients from across the globe over the pristine flats of the Gardens.
Both are smart, observant, and anxious to make a mark in their chosen fields.
Awed by the raw beauty of our surroundings, the young man from Texas had been justifiably distracted. Then, this beginning banker’s analytical training emerged as he began to decipher Tony’s pattern.
Sure enough, when I paid attention the method to our guide’s madness took shape.
Bonefish in muds, in the mangroves and atop the grass covered flats seem readily available throughout the day. When the tarpon became mid-day scarce, or the tide stage was unfavorable for permit, Tony had a bonefish spot just around the bend.
“All guides have a limit to how long they will go not catching fish.” I explained to Alek one afternoon. “And, they all have a bailout plan.”
“It’s just bazaar.” Alek countered. “The guides are using one of the most sot after fly targets in the world to break the boredom…..to bailout.”
We were sipping mojitos mixed and delivered to the rear deck of our mothership “Tortuga” by Milkis, Avalon’s beautiful blond bartender. Avalon Fishing Center is the exclusive angling company of the Gardens. Shaded from the brutal mid-August sun, we chatted with others of our group from as far away as Finland about our new discovery.
Chris and son Mike, from Boulder, Colorado added they had stayed with the bones one full morning, releasing over thirty before breaking off for an afternoon dive. “We first caught them in muds.” Mike said. “But when the tide got high we found them in the mangroves, fining and tailing.
Walt from Sarasota, Florida added the fish were well above the size of the vast schools he’s fished in Mexico. “We had them pretty much at will there too.” He offered. “But, they weren’t nearly the size of these.”
Whether this steady stream of bonefish can be counted on year round is an unknown to our group. But, it suffices to say that in August of 2015, sixty miles off the south coast of Cuba, bailing out with bonefish was the plan.

Fish Cuba Now! Support the Cuban People – Zapata Enviromental School

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img_4637Ruskin fisherman works to preserve Cuba’s environment
Paul Guzzo, Times Staff Writer
Tuesday, November 15, 2016 6:00am

Ruskin’s Phil Thompson is helping to start a program in Cuba focused on teaching skills needed to protect nature and earn a living through eco-tourism to children living around the island’s Zapata Swamp National Park
TAMPA — Phil Thompson has cast enough fishing line in Cuba that it has become a second home for the Ruskin native and resident.

“Oh man, I love Cuba,” said Thompson, 64, who has been participating in fishing tournaments there since 1993. “I love its people. I love its culture. I love its beautiful nature.”
So Thompson feels a responsibility to help protect the island’s pristine nature reserves, some of which are being threatened by an onslaught of tourist anglers.
Thompson has spent the past year recruiting a collection of Americans — including the grandson of Ernest Hemingway — to help teach kids living around the island’s Zapata Swamp National Park how to protect the ecosystems and earn a living via ecotourism.
“Zapata is one of Cuba’s most beautiful sanctuaries,” Thompson said. “The kids there are its future stewards.”
Titled “The Guiding Youth Project,” the after-school and weekend program is still in its planning phase. But sponsors hope it eventually will include classroom facilities and will recruit Cuban citizens to teach the children about all aspects of environmental sustainability.
Under U.S. law, Americans still can’t visit Cuba for tourism reasons. A trip must fall under one of 12 categories, including education, humanitarian, scientific research and athletic competition. Fishing tournaments in Cuba fall under the last category.
But recreational fishing there is considered a tourist activity.
It now seems doubtful that the United States’ Cuba tourism ban will be lifted under President-elect Donald Trump’s administration. Trump has promised to reverse President Barack Obama’s executive orders that move toward normalizing relations with the island nation.
Still, even without Americans, the Cuban tourism industry is surging and Thompson said these visitors are beginning to realize that the island’s nature reserves are as beautiful as its popular beaches.
He is concerned that overfishing and new waterside hotels to house tourists could damage the nation’s ecosystem. But Thompson also believes there can be a balance between business and environmental protection.
Rather than building giant resorts, he said, small bed-and-breakfasts and inns that cater to ecotourists can have a positive impact on the economy without hurting the environment.
Last year, he started his own “Support the Cuban People Fishing Program” that teaches Cuban anglers proper catch-and-release techniques and how to run small charter boat operations that focus on quality outings instead of the quantity of fish reeled in.
It was while holding such classes that Thompson met Felipe Alonso, a fishing guide in the Zapata Park on Cuba’s southern coast.
Alonso instructs at-risk children how to work in his field. As adults, he hopes, they will feel compelled to protect Cuban nature sanctuaries against overdevelopment, even if tourism dollars prove a big temptation.
Thompson agreed to help the Cuban fishing guide expand his program, enlisting Patrick Hemingway — grandson of the American author beloved in Cuba — and Jeffrey Boutwell, board member with the Latin America Working Group Education Fund in Washington, D.C.
“It’s not that anyone wants to keep Zapata restrictive or for the privileged,” Boutwell said, “But it has to be managed in an environmentally sound way and in a way that allows only a certain amount of traffic. That takes knowledge.”
Thompson also recruited Jay Shelton and Kris Irwin, professors from the University of Georgia who are already involved with their institution’s satellite campus in Costa Rica, where university students learn about environmental sustainability on a 155-acre campus that doubles as a nature preserve.
Shelton and Irwin are applying for grants to purchase computers, scientific equipment and classroom supplies for the Cuban program. And schools and community centers in that area have expressed interest in hosting the program until land can be acquired on which to build facilities.
“We will make this happen,” Thompson said. “I guarantee it.”

Fish Cuba Now! Support The Cuban People Preserving Cuba’s Enviroment

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TAMPA — Phil Thompson has cast enough fishing line in Cuba that it has become a second home for the Ruskin native and resident.

“Oh man, I love Cuba,” said Thompson, 64, who has been participating in fishing tournaments there since 1993. “I love its people. I love its culture. I love its beautiful nature.”

So Thompson feels a responsibility to help protect the island’s pristine nature reserves, some of which are being threatened by an onslaught of tourist anglers.

Thompson has spent the past year recruiting a collection of Americans — including the grandson of Ernest Hemingway — to help teach kids living around the island’s Zapata Swamp National Park how to protect the ecosystems and earn a living via ecotourism.

“Zapata is one of Cuba’s most beautiful sanctuaries,” Thompson said. “The kids there are its future stewards.”

Titled “The Guiding Youth Project,” the after-school and weekend program is still in its planning phase. But sponsors hope it eventually will include classroom facilities and will recruit Cuban citizens to teach the children about all aspects of environmental sustainability.

Under U.S. law, Americans still can’t visit Cuba for tourism reasons. A trip must fall under one of 12 categories, including education, humanitarian, scientific research and athletic competition. Fishing tournaments in Cuba fall under the last category.

But recreational fishing there is considered a tourist activity.

It now seems doubtful that the United States’ Cuba tourism ban will be lifted under President-elect Donald Trump’s administration. Trump has promised to reverse President Barack Obama’s executive orders that move toward normalizing relations with the island nation.

Still, even without Americans, the Cuban tourism industry is surging and Thompson said these visitors are beginning to realize that the island’s nature reserves are as beautiful as its popular beaches.

He is concerned that overfishing and new waterside hotels to house tourists could damage the nation’s ecosystem. But Thompson also believes there can be a balance between business and environmental protection.

Rather than building giant resorts, he said, small bed-and-breakfasts and inns that cater to ecotourists can have a positive impact on the economy without hurting the environment.

Last year, he started his own “Support the Cuban People Fishing Program” that teaches Cuban anglers proper catch-and-release techniques and how to run small charter boat operations that focus on quality outings instead of the quantity of fish reeled in.

It was while holding such classes that Thompson met Felipe Alonso, a fishing guide in the Zapata Park on Cuba’s southern coast.

Alonso instructs at-risk children how to work in his field. As adults, he hopes, they will feel compelled to protect Cuban nature sanctuaries against overdevelopment, even if tourism dollars prove a big temptation.

Thompson agreed to help the Cuban fishing guide expand his program, enlisting Patrick Hemingway — grandson of the American author beloved in Cuba — and Jeffrey Boutwell, board member with the Latin America Working Group Education Fund in Washington, D.C.

“It’s not that anyone wants to keep Zapata restrictive or for the privileged,” Boutwell said, “But it has to be managed in an environmentally sound way and in a way that allows only a certain amount of traffic. That takes knowledge.”

Thompson also recruited Jay Shelton and Kris Irwin, professors from the University of Georgia who are already involved with their institution’s satellite campus in Costa Rica, where university students learn about environmental sustainability on a 155-acre campus that doubles as a nature preserve.

Shelton and Irwin are applying for grants to purchase computers, scientific equipment and classroom supplies for the Cuban program. And schools and community centers in that area have expressed interest in hosting the program until land can be acquired on which to build facilities.

“We will make this happen,” Thompson said. “I guarantee it.”

Fish Cuba Now! Support the Cuban People – Traditional Fishing Ends In Zapata

img_4040La Salina
The decades old van rumbled and bounced down the marl road past flaming red flamingos sifting brine shrimp through ceramic painted beaks. Ahead, at the road’s end lay our destination, the shallow clear waters of La Salina, Cuba.
Once a hub of salt mining, this isolated point at the southern tip of the Zapata peninsular now attracts fly fishermen from around the world. Set within the Zapata swamp –the largest wetland preserve in the Caribbean – just two hours outside bustling Havana, La Salina seems light years away from Cuba’s capitol city.
When Dr. Robert Douville boarded the charter plane in Key West he had never heard of La Salina. The southernmost city opthamologist was bound for Cuba to confer with counterparts he’s been consulting with for years.
Spotting my fly rod case, Doc instigated a conversation about fishing in Cuba that lasted throughout the fifty minute flight. Phone numbers were exchanged and plans were hastily made for a joint journey to Zapata.
Four mornings later we left a sleeping Havana under a brightening sky, speeding southeast down the divided highway called an autopisto. Later, tour buses and groups of birders would follow, depositing there human cargo at the crocodile farm before continuing on to Playa Giron, known to Americans as “The Bay of Pigs.”
Access to La Salina is limited and strictly controlled. Advance reservation are required and only six skiffs are available for booking. These shallow water, non-motorized craft, powered by pole hold a single angler and guide, and of course a fly rod or two.
Our guides, Julio and Elio are both over sixty, fit and honed by days on the pole and bronzed by years under Cuba’s tropical sun. And, like most fishermen I’ve met in Cuba, they’re knowledgeable, proud and partial to Americans, regarding us as neighbors and friends.
In less than fifteen minutes Julio has led us into the first mangrove pasture, entering this watery garden on the flood tide of a waxing moon. Responding to his instructions, we stand legs spread, balanced precariously in the bow of a craft resembling more a dugout canoe than a Hells Bay Skiff.
Silence now is our friend and the sound is deafening, the stillness only interrupted by the soft swish of the pole and the scrape of nursling mangrove shoots against the fiberglass hull.
Within minutes the first bonefish is spotted, gliding along the edge of a storm damaged mangrove clump. Its dark silhouette contrasts with the lighter brown of the rich bottom as the seven pound fish meanders, unaware of our presence.
This would be the program of the morning with singles, pairs and sometimes trios of bones scattered, fining, tailing and feeding in areas only accessible on the high water. Later groups would form into protective schools of twenty fish or more, moving in unison, driven from the cover by the falling water.
Stopping for lunch we anchored together, chatting with our new Cuban friends, bursting with excitement over the plentiful fish, the serenity of the area and the richness of the environment.
“I can’t remember the last time I fished and didn’t see another boat.” Doc said, between bites of a fresh Cuban orange, angel finger bananas and smoked ham and cheese, sandwiched between slices of freshly baked bread.
“The real challenge,” I added, “Is not finding or hooking these fish. It’s landing them among the roots and mangrove shoots.”
We had lost several this morning while our guides pushed, instructed and dodged around what can only be dubbed as a bonefish obstacle course.
Doc kicked back watching a pair of pink Flamingos crossing the blue sky, headed to join the feeding frenzy of their peers.
“I began practicing medicine in Key West in the eighties.” He said. “I love Key’s fishing, but I could very easily get used to this.”

Capt. Phil Thompson
www.captphilthompson.com

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Fish Cuba Now! Support the Cuban People – Wahoo! Wahoo!

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Wolfpacking Wahoo

November and December brings masses of migrating Wahoo, swimming a stone’s throw from the beach and dominating Cuba’s North coast fishery.
Fast, ferocious, excellent table fare, are words used to describe one of the swiftest and most sought after gamefish on planet Earth. In Cuba, these veracious eaters are treasured for their pack like attacks on trolling spreads, popping every clip, bending every rod and generating organized chaos on the back deck.
The migration brings them close, between the Marina Hemingway sea buoy and Mariel Harbor, less than 100 yards off the beach,
In celebration of the arrival of the wahoo, Fish Cuba Now has put together an exciting and affordable offshore angling package for those who want to experience world class fishing and tour historic Havana.
Fish Cuba Now handles all details including lodging, transportation and fishing with some of the most experienced captains in Cuba. Just bring the desire to battle one of the oceans greatest adversaries.
With over twenty-five years of angling experience in Cuba, Capt. Phil Thompson will assure your trip is the angling adventure of a lifetime.
Five day six night package for fall 2016.

*Airport service (airfare not included)
*Six nights lodging at Casa Estrella (within walking distance of Marina Hemingway)
*Three full days fishing
*Guided full day tour of Havana, Moro Castle, Hemingway’s house
*Car and driver at your disposal
*Meals include breakfast, lunch and a cook your catch traditional Cuban dinner
*All for only $1700.00/ person. (4 anglers)
Email or call today….Wahoo season is just around the corner and Cuba’s filing up fast.
Capt. Phil Thompson Pres.
Fishcubanow.com
fishcubanow@nauta.cu
US 813-770-4421
CU 535-483-4202

FISH CUBA NOW Support the Cuban People- Kiki

 

img_2389The 2015 Hemingway International Billfish Tournament awards ceremony has ended. Now the world renowned band “The Buena Vista Social Club” has the crowd rocking to traditional Cuban salsa music – even the waiters and waitresses are dancing.

Making his way through the melee, Captain Pedro Santos Jr.- his beautiful fiancé at his side – works the crowd like a modern day politician. The young Cuban captain’s handsome face is lit with a broad smile as he greets the first place finishing crew of Billy the Kid, then lingers at the table of Unclaimed, the boat that finished third.

His father, Pedro Calvo Santos is a member of Unclaimed’s crew which set a tournament record five marlin releases in one day, a feat in any billfish completion.

As father and son embrace, it’s impossible to miss the loving bond between them

Although young Pedro’s team failed to place in this year’s competition, he graciously greets competitors from seven different countries including the American teams, allowed to legally compete for the first time in over forty years.

It’s not that the fire of completion doesn’t burn bright in this young man, because it certainly does. Two years ago I had the chance to observe Pedro’s competitive spirit first hand when we fished together on Unclaimed. We won the coveted first place trophy and his grace and demeanor were the same in victory as in this year’s disappointing finish.

Captain Pedro represents the new Cuba – highly educated in his profession, confident in his career choice and optimistic about his future. Ready to makes friends with the world, he welcomes Cuba’s emergence from political and economic isolation and sees the establishment of diplomatic relations with the United States as good for his country and its impoverished citizens.

Like many of his peers, Pedro would love to go to the U.S.- not emigrate but visit and see for himself if the Hollywood version of life displayed on television sets across his beautiful but tragic island is accurate.

Also, like many of his fellow countrymen, Pedro has refused offers to be pirated off the island, choosing instead to patiently wait for a legal path when he believes visiting the colossuses to the north and returning will be as simple as boarding a ferry to Key West, Miami or Tampa.

“I’m Cuban.” He said one morning over breakfast at La Cova, a small sandwich shop located in the vast Marina Hemingway complex. “I love my country and could not see living elsewhere.”

He removes a small photo of an eight year old boy holding an ancient Penn rod and reel. “This is me.” He smiles. “I’ve never wanted to do anything else but fish.”

Pedro’s fishing roots reach back too many generations to count. His ancestors –much like Hemingway’s character Santiago in Old Man and the Sea – sailed their skiffs out from the sheltered cove of the Jimaitas River, waging war with giant marlin, swordfish and darado, often battling creatures larger than their boats with only hand line and lance.

“It was kill fish or don’t eat.” Pedro pronounces with a look back into a past he understands but doesn’t emulate. In 2013 he was recognized in a ceremony at the Hemingway Tournament’s captains meeting as an International Game Fish Association outstanding Captain. Presenting the award, I.G.F.A President Rob Kramer said, “Captain Pedro Santos represents the best of Cuba’s Captains.” The I.G.F.A. maintains a strict catch and release policy regarding billfish and is dedicated to the preservation of fishing resources worldwide.

“My father used to go to my teachers in high school and get permission for me to take a week off and fish the Hemingway”, says the 28 year old. “He only did this if I made up the work and kept my grades high.”

In the late nineties and up until 2003, the tournament included as many as forty American boats, most looking for experienced Cuban captains and crews. The money paid these mariners for sharing their local knowledge helped feed and clothe families suffering though some of the most difficult years of the island’s post revolution history.

With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1989 Cuba lost an estimated 9 billion dollars in subsidies, throwing the island and its populace into financial straits. Food was scarce and basic necessities disappeared. Any outside revenue such as the dollars paid for crewing on the American boats was a godsend. One week’s enumeration from a tournament job could feed a family for six months.

President Gorge Bush shut down the American competitors voyages to Cuba in 2003 and with his edict, ”We will no longer allow American yachtsmen to travel to Cuba for sex.” The dollars disappeared.

Kiki wanted to commercial fish to help feed the family but his father said no. “If you’re going to go to sea, it will be as a captain, not as a mate.”

Kiki enrolled in the Cuban Naval Academy along with 13 other hopeful candidates and began a grueling two year study which includes basic seamanship, navigation and rules of the road. Of the 14 student in Kiki’s class only he and one other graduated.

With license in hand Kiki now qualified to pilot boats for Club Natico, the major non-government maritime employer in Marina Hemingway. His vast knowledge of local waters and outgoing personality made him a favorite of charter clients and visiting yachtsmen alike. An American with a boat in Cuba plucked Kiki from the ranks of Hemmingway captains and hired him as permanent crew on his modern sportfishing yacht, a goal for any marina employee.

Ask where he sees himself in five years, Kiki smiles and ponders the question for less than a minute. “I want to captain an even larger boat.” He says, looking down the road. “A boat that can travel freely to any port in the world.” With Kiki’s education, experience and pleasant demeanor, his dreams stand a good chance of coming true. In this time of rapid change in Cuba….anything is possible.

 

 

 

 

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FISH CUBA NOW!

Bailout – maritime in origin, it’s the act of removing water from a sinking vessel….usually with a small bucket.

 Bailing Out With Bonefish

Every fly fisherman knows frustration when unable find, hook or land their target species. But, to fishing guides, being compensated for their expertise – wind, clouds, murky water or a lack of interest….are just excuses.

Key West’s annual tarpon migration attracts a flood of anglers anxious to test their skills on one of the world’s top gamefish. At the height of the season, these silver sided, air breathing monsters flow down the beaches in schools often a mile long. Although an awesome sight for anyone with a rod in hand, if the wind is wrong, the tarpon develop lockjaw.

On these days many Key’s guides turn to barracuda as a bail out fish. Although exciting when hooked, jumping and snapping and armed with a dangerous mouthful of teeth, a ten pound cuda is not a 100-pound tarpon.

Montauk

Capt. Grizz fishes marlin, – his territory, offshore of Cabo San Lucas Mexico. Twelve wt. rods and a “tease them up and throw” technique is the preferred method when perusing stripped, black, blue marlin and sailfish.

“Veteran captains know when it is not going to happen. On those days we’ll head inshore for rooster fish or cero mackerel. We’ll downsize the tackle and bend a rod. It can turn the day around.”

Bailing out it’s called and every charter captain and guide has a plan. When the targeted species can’t be found –or won’t co-operate, switch.

“Jardine de la Renia”- “Garden of the Queens” is reverently referred to as the most natural reef and flats ecosystem existing in the Caribbean today. Cuba’s oldest aquatic preserve was a favorite spearfishing site for Fidel Castro, a fact, along with geography – it lies sixty miles off the island’s south coast – has allowed it to lay virtually untouched by man.

This collection of uninhabited barrier Keys, or Cayos, and miles of flats separate the shallow bay of ____ from the clear blue water of the Caribbean. Beyond the deserted white sand beaches and the pristine coral reef, the ocean bottom drops to infinity.

 

My new friend Alec Rich first called it to my attention in the middle of our second day of fly fishing in the Gardens.

“See how he keeps taking us back to bonefish.” He said quietly. “Every time the fishing slows we go back to catching bones.”

 

Alec and our Avalon fishing guide Tony are the same age, early twenties. Although separated by language, these two young men from totally diverse backgrounds and experiences found a bond in the shared love of fishing….the report was instant.

Alec recently graduated from Tulane with a degree in finance and has begun his banking career in petroleum finance.

Tony just completed the two-year training program required by all Avalon guides and has begun a career of poling fly clients from the world over across the pristine flats of the Garden.

Both are smart, observant and anxious to make a mark in their chosen career fields.

Awed by the raw beauty of our surroundings, the young man from Texas had been justifiably distracted. Now, this beginning banker’s analytical training emerged as he began to understand Tony’s pattern.

Sure enough when I paid attention the method to our guide’s madness took shape.

Bonefish in muds, in the mangroves and atop the grass covered flats seem readily available throughout the day. When the tarpon became mid-day scarce, or the tide stage was unfavorable for permit, Tony had a bonefish spot just around the bend.

“All guides have a limit to how long they can go not catching fish.” I explained to Alec one afternoon. “And, they all have a bailout plan.”

“It’s just bazaar.” Alec offered. “The guides are using one of the most sot after fly angler’s targets, to break the boredom…..to bailout.”

We were enjoying mojtoes mixed and delivered to the rear deck of our mothership “Tortuga” by Milkis, Avalon’s beautiful blond bartender. Avalon fishing Center is the exclusive fish and dive company of the Garden. Shaded from the brutal mid-August sun, we chatted with others of our group from as far away as Finland about our new discovery.

Chris and son Mike, from Boulder added they had stayed with the bones one full morning, releasing over thirty before breaking off for an afternoon dive. “We bailed them off muds.” Mike said. “But when the tide got high we found them in the mangroves, fining and tailing.”

No one can say for sure if this bailout with bonefish strategy will work year round but, for a week in late August we found it a great solution for combating what ordinarily be the down hours of our fishing days.